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Fixed confusing comments. Fixes #231

tablepad
Oliver 4 years ago
parent
commit
84fdb36408
  1. 50
      grid.go
  2. 2
      list.go

50
grid.go

@ -75,28 +75,28 @@ func NewGrid() *Grid {
return g
}
// SetRows defines how the rows of the grid are distributed. Each value defines
// the size of one row, starting with the leftmost row. Values greater 0
// represent absolute row widths (gaps not included). Values less or equal 0
// represent proportional row widths or fractions of the remaining free space,
// where 0 is treated the same as -1. That is, a row with a value of -3 will
// have three times the width of a row with a value of -1 (or 0). The minimum
// width set with SetMinSize() is always observed.
// SetColumns defines how the columns of the grid are distributed. Each value
// defines the size of one column, starting with the leftmost column. Values
// greater 0 represent absolute column widths (gaps not included). Values less
// or equal 0 represent proportional column widths or fractions of the remaining
// free space, where 0 is treated the same as -1. That is, a column with a value
// of -3 will have three times the width of a column with a value of -1 (or 0).
// The minimum width set with SetMinSize() is always observed.
//
// Primitives may extend beyond the rows defined explicitly with this function.
// A value of 0 is assumed for any undefined row. In fact, if you never call
// this function, all rows occupied by primitives will have the same width.
// On the other hand, unoccupied rows defined with this function will always
// take their place.
// Primitives may extend beyond the columns defined explicitly with this
// function. A value of 0 is assumed for any undefined column. In fact, if you
// never call this function, all columns occupied by primitives will have the
// same width. On the other hand, unoccupied columns defined with this function
// will always take their place.
//
// Assuming a total width of the grid of 100 cells and a minimum width of 0, the
// following call will result in rows with widths of 30, 10, 15, 15, and 30
// following call will result in columns with widths of 30, 10, 15, 15, and 30
// cells:
//
// grid.SetRows(30, 10, -1, -1, -2)
// grid.Setcolumns(30, 10, -1, -1, -2)
//
// If a primitive were then placed in the 6th and 7th row, the resulting widths
// would be: 30, 10, 10, 10, 20, 10, and 10 cells.
// If a primitive were then placed in the 6th and 7th column, the resulting
// widths would be: 30, 10, 10, 10, 20, 10, and 10 cells.
//
// If you then called SetMinSize() as follows:
//
@ -104,19 +104,19 @@ func NewGrid() *Grid {
//
// The resulting widths would be: 30, 15, 15, 15, 20, 15, and 15 cells, a total
// of 125 cells, 25 cells wider than the available grid width.
func (g *Grid) SetRows(rows ...int) *Grid {
g.rows = rows
func (g *Grid) SetColumns(columns ...int) *Grid {
g.columns = columns
return g
}
// SetColumns defines how the columns of the grid are distributed. These values
// behave the same as the row values provided with SetRows(), see there for
// a definition and examples.
// SetRows defines how the rows of the grid are distributed. These values behave
// the same as the column values provided with SetColumns(), see there for a
// definition and examples.
//
// The provided values correspond to column heights, the first value defining
// the height of the topmost column.
func (g *Grid) SetColumns(columns ...int) *Grid {
g.columns = columns
// The provided values correspond to row heights, the first value defining
// the height of the topmost row.
func (g *Grid) SetRows(rows ...int) *Grid {
g.rows = rows
return g
}

2
list.go

@ -379,7 +379,7 @@ func (l *List) Draw(screen tcell.Screen) {
}
}
// Adjust offset to keep the current selection in view?
// Adjust offset to keep the current selection in view.
if l.currentItem < l.offset {
l.offset = l.currentItem
} else if l.showSecondaryText {

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